The Oculus/ZeniMax lawsuit has just come to a close, and some people are not too happy.

John Carmack is one of these people, as he was personally accused of “non-literally” copying ZeniMax code. Carmack mentioned that the expert in the case used an analogy essentially saying that Oculus wrote Harry Potter with the names all changed, which is still essentially copyright infringement. He denied this analogy, saying that if you abstract Harry Potter up a couple of marks you get the generalized Hero’s Journey.

Carmack refutes the claims put in place by the expert from the other side, saying he internally secretly wanted to stand up and demand data and metrics that prove that the data was copied. He says that “the notion of non-literal copying is delicious to lawyers”, since they are able to prove how any kind of concept is related. Unfortunately for Oculus however, their lawyers were not able to prove that this copying did not take place, and the company now owes $500 million in damages.

If you want to check out Carmack’s full post, you can read it here. What do you think about the courts decision? Carmack’s post is certainly interesting, so check out his thoughts on the matter if you want the opinion of both sides.

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